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Support #NetNeutrality

Net neutrality lacks an easy definition but here is what concluded:

Telecom operators/ISPs are access services providers, and can control either how much you access, what you access, how fast you access and how much you pay to access content and services on the Internet.

It’s important for access to knowledge, services and free speech, as well as freedom and ease of doing business online, for this access to be neutral:

– All sites must be equally accessible
– The same access speed at the telco/ISP level for each (independent of telco selection)
– The same data cost for access to each site (per KB/MB).

Few months back, US President Barack Obama came in support of Net Neutrality, urging the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to implement the strongest possible rules to protect net neutrality. Some of the rules suggested by Obama include:

No blocking: If a consumer requests access to a website or a service, ISPs should not be permitted to block it, enabling every player “gets a fair shot at your business.”

No throttling: ISPs should not intentionally slow down some content or speed up others based on the type of service or their preferences.

– Increased transparency:  The connection between consumers and ISPs is not the only place some sites might get special treatment. Hence, if necessary, FCC should apply net neutrality rules to points of interconnection between the ISP and the rest of the Internet.

– No paid prioritization: No service should be stuck in a “slow lane” because it does not pay a fee. Obama asked for an explicit ban on paid prioritization and any other restriction that has a similar effect.

Now this situation in India is not just bad we have a ‘zero’ net neutrality.

In many countries including India, there are social economical obstacles to connectivity. Few days back Mark Zukerberg on a facebook post shared his position on #netneutrality and internet.org. Here is what he said

Over the past week in India, there has been a lot written about Internet.org and net neutrality. I’d like to share my position on these topics here for everyone to see.First, I’ll share a quick story. Last year I visited Chandauli, a small village in northern India that had just been connected to the internet.

In a classroom in the village, I had the chance to talk to a group of students who were learning to use the internet. It was an incredible experience to think that right there in that room might be a student with a big idea that could change the world — and now they could actually make that happen through the internet. The internet is one of the most powerful tools for economic and social progress. It gives people access to jobs, knowledge and opportunities. It gives voice to the voiceless in our society, and it connects people with vital resources for health and education.

I believe everyone in the world deserves access to these opportunities.

We fully support net neutrality. We want to keep the internet open. Net neutrality ensures network operators don’t discriminate by limiting access to services you want to use. It’s an essential part of the open internet, and we are fully committed to it. But net neutrality is not in conflict with working to get more people connected. These two principles — universal connectivity and net neutrality — can and must coexist.

This is an urge to every Indian youth support net neutrality.